This is the process that makes a car stand out from the crowd.  It also makes it
easier to replace the worn pieces in the suspension.  My plan was to lift the rear on
the body with a engine hoist and jack up the front with a floor jack.  When it got high
enough I would pull the frame out from the side.  It sounded easy in my head and
went even easier. I started on a Saturday morning and had the frame sitting next to
the body 3 hours later. The body rests on 4x4s on top of heavy duty jack stands.
Now the real work begins
The frame had layers of dirt on it and many rocks inside.  The only real way to restore a
car is to do this step. It would have been a waste of money to restore the body and
interior and leave the underside looking the way it did. After inspecting the frame I
found it free of pitting and damage. You can really tell the difference between a
midwest frame and a western frame, western frames have zero pitting and relatively
zero scale.
At this point I took a million photos of the frame. I noted every bolts location and direction,
where each line clip went, and every other area where a piece bolted on the frame.   
Then it was time to break it all apart.  You can blast the frame all together but why? After
40 years, suspension pieces get worn.  Do the extra work and fix everything that needs
fixing. You have come this far so might as well do it right. So, thats what I did.
Now that the frame was bare, I had it sand blasted. I then took all the suspension
pieces to work to have them bead blasted. The glass bead media I used wasnt as
harsh as the industial sand used on the frame, resulting in a nice smooth surface for
painting.
This was a major point in the restoration. There wasnt a single thing left to take apart.  
The car was completely disassembled. Now was the time for making things nice again.